Middle Grade Monday Book Review: Zora and Me – The Cursed Ground by T.R. Simon

zora

Release Date:  September 11, 2018

Publisher:  Candlewick Press

Page Count: Hardcover, 272 pages

Genre: Middle Grade, African-American literature, Slavery

Appeal (in my opinion): Good for very high middle grade readers (12+) due to the complicated vocabulary and themes of slavery and violence. Best read after learning about the history of slavery in America and the Civil War.

Rating: 5/5 stars

Bookstagrammer Bits: Unknown – just read digital ARC at this time.

Conversations with Kids: Racism in America, Jim Crow era and segregation, Slavery in America including physical violence.

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

A powerful fictionalized account of Zora Neale Hurston’s childhood adventures explores the idea of collective memory and the lingering effects of slavery.

“History ain’t in a book, especially when it comes to folks like us. History is in the lives we lived and the stories we tell each other about those lives.”

When Zora Neale Hurston and her best friend, Carrie Brown, discover that the town mute can speak after all, they think they’ve uncovered a big secret. But Mr. Polk’s silence is just one piece of a larger puzzle that stretches back half a century to the tragic story of an enslaved girl named Lucia. As Zora’s curiosity leads a reluctant Carrie deeper into the mystery, the story unfolds through alternating narratives. Lucia’s struggle for freedom resonates through the years, threatening the future of America’s first incorporated black township — the hometown of author Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960). In a riveting coming-of-age tale, award-winning author T. R. Simon champions the strength of a people to stand up for justice.

review 5 star

Review:

The Cursed Ground is the 2nd in the Zora and Me series, which is a fictionalized representation of the childhood of Zora Neale Hurston. It can stand on its own though and you do not need to read the first one to appreciate this book. Hurston was an influential author of African-American literature and anthropologist, who portrayed racial struggles in the early 20th century American South. This book is told from the perspective of Zora’s best friend, Carrie, in Eatonville, Florida, which is historically significant because it was the first self-governing all African American town in the US. The pair of 12-year-olds work to discover the story behind Mr. Polk’s mysterious injury and escaped horses.

Alternating between 1903 and 1855, the narrative goes from vivid accounts of slavery to the hatred and racial tensions of the Jim Crow era. It was heart-wrenching and eye-opening at the same time, with the children so confused on how they could be hated just for the color of their skin. 

“I don’t know, girls. White folks have a disease. A disease that started with slavery. We taught ourselves to see colored folks as inferior so we could enslave them. And now we have a need to keep seeing them as inferior. White folks have become dependent on feeling superior to the colored race; no matter how low we fall, we can tell ourselves that the colored man is always lower.”

The antics of Zora and Carrie were a little more light-hearted which balanced the seriousness of the slavery era flashbacks. I was riveted by the 1855 storyline and there was a twist I definitely didn’t see coming. I really liked how they blended together in a full circle at the end of the book. It was very well done.

The elevated vocabulary (talisman, truncated, belied, for example) and many beautiful but complicated sentences lead me to categorize it as very high middle grade, probably 12+ at least. I thought this sentence was beautifully written but even as a college-educated voracious reader, I had to read it three times to fully grasp it. “Unfortunately, Zora had caught the split second of my ambivalence and used it as a shortcut across the field of my will to the junction of our compromise.” 

Also, due to the serious subject of slavery and racial tensions, I would not suggest reading it until learning about the history of slavery in America. I definitely recommend it if the reader is mature enough to handle the topic. Below are some of the quotes that really impacted me.

1855:

If there is a kindness that can soften the blow of stolen freedom, I have not seen it.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  

What kind of father raises two daughters, one free and one a slave? What sort of man enslaves his own daughter to be sold? In the very same instant, Miss Alice had given me my father and taken him away.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

They could beat us, they could sell our loved ones away from us, but they could not reach our souls. They could not destroy our hope for others even when we could not hope for ourselves.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

Horatio’s words came back to me: Hate too hard and it’ll steal the memory of what you love. Hate long enough, and you won’t feel nothing for no one.

1903:

I had always thought Old Lady Bronson was a witch, and so I feared her strength and power. But all that time, she was just a woman, filled with the same vulnerability, pain, and misery life holds for each of us.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

Lady Bronson thought Mr. Polk’s story and her story were theirs to keep, but they’re not. Don’t you see? Their stories are Eatonville’s stories, Eatonville’s history. I thought history was something in books, but it’s not. History is alive. Old Lady Bronson and Mr. Polk are living history.”

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

Mr. Ambrose took a full minute to respond. “It would be a lie to say I didn’t. Every white man I know has the seed of race hate planted and rooted in him by the time he’s reached his fifth year. This country is founded on it, and not even a civil war could uproot it. The only way to fight that hate is to consciously decide every day to choose against the hate we’ve been taught.”

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

These men had fathered and made this town whole in spite of the hate of an entire nation. These men had picked cotton, oranges, and tobacco from sunup to sundown and still came home most days shunning misery and weaving wonder with tales about outsmarting Ole Massa and the devil, too. These men made women laugh at least as much as they made them cry, and they preached sermons so we had a code for living, built houses so we had a place to live, and dug graves so we had a place to rest when we died. These men refused to be hardened by the yoke or the whip of white men or by fear. Instead of being immobilized by their own degradation, they became brave beyond measure. These men had come from places that said our town was something only a fool would dream, then dreamed Eatonville into existence. They then swore a blood oath to protect it with their lives. To take some was to take all. Each man here was ready to hold everything he loved up against the price of losing one square inch of Eatonville. Eatonville represented freedom itself.

–  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –  –

The white men found themselves outnumbered three-to-one and looking down the barrels of nineteen rifles and shotguns. Still, the white men sat easy on their horses, comfortable even. A slow, sad awareness began to dawn on me. It didn’t matter how many guns we had. Their whiteness was stronger than our guns. Their skin itself was their power. Even if we shot them dead, the power of their whiteness would live on to see us all hanged. Our men were not real to them; they were mere shadows, without substance or soul.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s